Class 15: Final Pre-pub Checklist

Civilian_Conservation_Corps,_Third_Corps_Area,_typing_class_with_W.P.A._instructor_-_NARA_-_197144We’ll be using iBooks Author to finish our iBooks today (Report to Digital lab / Clark Library).

Note: You will be adding your last blog post (reflection) as a final portion of the lesson. That can be your look back at the of the entire document based lesson process.

Here’s our final pre-publication checklist

  1. We will use the Inspector/ Document to disable “Hyphenate.”
  2. Your chapters will need your names. If you have a website, Twitter or LinkedIn page, etc – you can link to it so readers can find you.
  3. Does your chapter include relevant dates (or eras).
  4. You will need to have links back to documents / content. They should not just link to jpg file, but the entire source as listed in whatever archive you used.
  5. Sources can be cited adjacent to document or at end of the lesson as Work Cited.
  6. All links should all be checked to see if they work. To save space consider just using the words source and making it a hyperlink.
  7. Looking for icons to spice it up? Check out The Noun Project. They are free and should be cited in your sources if the name gets cut off of icon.
  8. Some of the images you used are bit fuzzy in resolution. We can look for higher resolution versions.
  9. If you have large images, you can use a setting to make the images pop out to full size. (inspector/ widget/ interaction/ goes to full screen)
  10. Be sure you do not have any placeholder text in widgets “Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet….” That needs to be removed. iTunes will not accept the iBook.
  11. Look to be sure you don’t have any empty text boxes you might have added. They will be in the center of the page

Image Credit: Civilian Conservation Corps, Third Corps Area, typing class with W.P.A. instructor ca. 1933
National Archives and Records Administration Identifier: 197144

 

Class 13: Working with iBooks Author

History of the Bassandyne Bible

Digital technologies have put us in charge of the information we access, store, analyze and share.  Creating an iBook harnesses those motivational factors into an engaging learning experience. The ease of distribution across the world (via iTunes) means students can communicate with a broader, and more authentic audience than just their teacher and class peers.

This week we will wrap up our first drafts of our document based lessons for inclusion into our collaborative iBook. We’ll be working in the Digital Lab at Clark Library. This will be the fourth iBook published by our EdMethods students.

Technical aspects
The iBooks will be designed using iBooks Author in the Mac lab. Students will bring digital versions of their DBQs to the lab – including all image and sound files, text files, citations and URLs. Here’s a quick guide to managing your files to get ready for iBooks Author: edMethods Tool Kit: iBooks Author

I’ve created a YouTube channel with some short tutorials that students may wish to refer to. See iBooks Author Tips


Image credit: Image from page 94 of “History of the Bassandyne Bible, the first printed in Scotland with notices of the early printers of Edinburgh” (1887) William T Dobson,

Class 9: Using the Digital Lab

France_in_XXI_Century._SchoolToday we meet in the Digital Lab in the Library.

Our class has two phases:

Document-Based Lesson Pitch: Our class will open with a bit of “speed dating” of our ideas for the Document-Based Lesson Assignment. Students will have 3 mins to stand up and pitch their lesson idea using our shared Google slideshow. That will be followed by 6 mins of feedback from peers regarding the following:

  • You have an interesting generative / essential question worth answering.
  • Your initial appraisal indicates there are suitable documents available.
  • You have an idea for how students will be asked interpret your documents

Intro to iBooks Author: Students will have a chance to see how easy it is to import content into iBA. Some time to mess around with app should give you insight into how you will need to manage your workflow. For more info on using iBA see our edMethods Toolkit


Assignment:

Due 10/31: Next week we will do our second lesson study – be prepared with a 4 minute pitch with a lesson idea (not the same lesson as your document-based lesson). You might use our content, process, product, assessment approach (or any other format you prefer) We will give you feedback. No need for any media presentation or handouts. All oral presentation. Matching Halloween costume optional.


Preview: If you want to plan ahead, here’s what’s coming on document-based lesson. Students will begin to layout their document-based lesson using a Google Site. With one webpage to correspond to each page of the lesson.


Image credit: A 19th-Century Vision of the Year 2000

A series of futuristic pictures by Jean-Marc Côté and other artists issued in France in 1899, 1900, 1901 and 1910. Originally in the form of paper cards enclosed in cigarette/cigar boxes and, later, as postcards, the images depicted the world as it was imagined to be like in the then distant year of 2000. There are at least 87 cards known that were authored by various French artists, the first series being produced for the 1900 World Exhibition in Paris. More information and cards here.

Our New iBook – Exploring History Vol III

Exploring-History-IIIHere’s our new iBook just published by our Fall ’15 class at the University of Portland. Free at iTunes. Static pdf version Exploring History Vol III (29 MB)

It features thirteen engaging questions and historic documents that empower students to be the historian in the classroom. The units draw from a fascinating collection of text and multimedia content – documents, posters, photographs, audio, video, letter and other ephemera. “Stop-and-think” prompts based on CCSS skills guide students through analysis of the primary and secondary sources. Essential questions foster critical thinking. All documents include links back to the original source material so readers can remix the content into their own curated collections.

All of our students assignments had a public audience on this class blog and were designed to meet our three class goals:

  • Learn to think like a historian.
  • Become a skillful Instructional designer
  • Develop technical skills for production, reflection, growth and professional networking.

The lesson design process began early in the semester when students designed lessons in historical thinking skills based on the work of Sam Wineburg and the Stanford History Education Group (SHEG). They focussed on three key skills – Sourcing, Contextualizing and Corroborating. Then students identified essential questions worth answering and gathered documents to explore the question in an extended lesson design process.

Exploring History: Vol III was our PBL capstone and is available on iTunes in 51 countries around the world. Here’s a post (from fall 13 class) that describes our project workflow (including how we utilized iBooks Author).

Here’s Exploring History: Vol I created by our fall 2013 class. And Exploring History: Vol II designed by our fall 2014 class.

Here’s the US and World History lessons in chronological order:

  1. Finding Egyptian Needles in Western Haystacks 
by Heidi Kershner
  2. Pompeii by Caleb Wilson
  3. Samurai: Sources of Warrior Identity in Medieval Japan 
by Ben Heebner
  4. The Declaration of Independence by David Deis
  5. Reconstruction in Political Cartoons 
by EmmaLee Kuhlmann
  6. Regulation Through the Years 
by Chenoa Musillo Olson / Sarah Wieking
  7. Battle of the Somme by John Hunt
  8. The Lynching of Leo Frank by Jeff Smith
  9. The Waco Horror by Alekz Wray
  10. The Harlem Renaissance by Monica Portugal
  11. A Date of Infamy by Mollie Carter
  12. Anti-Vietnam War Imagery by Felicia Teba
  13. Examining the Ongoing Evolution of American Government by Eric Cole