Class 12: Mock Trials

Mug shot of Hazel McGuinness, Sydney Australia, 1929
Mug shot of Hazel McGuinness, Sydney Australia, 1929

I’m a big fan of using mock trials – they embody critical thinking in the classroom. Over the years I wrote a number of cases which proved to be effective tools for improving student analytic skills and Common Core skills. Here’s a few posts from my blog on using them in the classroom and a link to two mock trials and an appeals case that I developed.

CLP-logo_300x300This week we will be visited by Ms. Barbara Rost, program director, Classroom Law Project. She’ll provide resources for law related education. (Be sure to follow that link – loads of lesson plans!)

As a demonstration activity, she will guide us through a mock trial –Vickers v Hearst (443kb PDF) Rules of evidence here.

Barbara graduated with a Bachelor of Science from Portland State University after using the 11-year plan to earn her degree, something she does not advocate for others. Three years later she earned her J.D. from Lewis & Clark Law School. She enjoys combining her interests in law and education in her work at Classroom Law Project. She is married, has two daughters in college and a really cute dog.

Classroom Law Project is a non-profit organization dedicated to bringing civics, government and law to Oregon classrooms K-12. Teachers and students know CLP through programs such as mock trial, con team, Law Day conference (for students), Civics Conference for Teachers, court tours, weekly current events, professional development and more. CLP makes civic education fun. Its mission statement: Classroom Law Project is a non-profit organization of individuals, educators, lawyers, and civic leaders building strong communities by teaching students to become active citizens.


 

Assignment: Continue research / design for DBL (iBooks Author lab work on 11/23)

Workflow? See this guide Getting Ready for iBooks Author 57KB pdf


 

Image credit: Mug shot of Hazel McGuinness, Central Police Station, Sydney, 26 July 1929 NSW Police Forensic Photography Archive, Justice and Police Museum, Sydney Living Museums

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